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Spring Fill Announced

Cascade Water Alliance today announced it will begin the spring fill of the Lake Tapps Reservoir approximately Sunday, Feb. 18.   Cascade, which operates the White River-Lake Tapps system for eventual municipal water supply, brought the reservoir down to address dike stability issues as well as other projects for homeowners, Pierce County and the City of Bonney Lake.

The reservoir level is expected to initially rise rapidly, about five feet in the first week, and then gradually reaching 541.5 by March 15, with full recreational levels (542.5 feet) by mid-April. Cascade will reach maximum lake levels of 543 feet before Memorial Day for about 24 hours.

As a reminder, residents who wish to do any work on their property, bulkheads, docks, etc.,  must obtain all the necessary permits from the City of Bonney Lake, Pierce County, and the Department of Fish and Wildlife (if appropriate) and get a license from Cascade.  These documents must be obtained prior to beginning of construction.  For more information on Cascade’s licenses visit www.cascadewater.org or email contact@cascadewater.org

Lake Tapps is a recreational gem of the region, but it’s also a working reservoir owned and operated to eventually provide municipal drinking water to members of the Cascade Water Alliance.  Cascade purchased the 100-plus year old White River system and Lake Tapps Reservoir from Puget Sound Energy in 2009. Since then, Cascade has invested tens of millions of dollars to keep the reservoir infrastructure reliable and the waters healthy with milfoil control.

Keeping Lake Tapps clean and healthy is up to everyone who enjoys the lake today and into the future.  Residents are advised that nutrients from failing septic tanks and nutrients from fertilizers and from runoff feed vegetation in the reservoir and can result in excessive algae, toxic algae blooms, reduced water clarity, and stress on fish and wildlife. Look for programs this year aimed at helping homeowners help Cascade keep Lake Tapps clean and healthy. 

Learn more about Cascade Water Alliance at www.cascadewater.org.


Cascade Water Alliance Announces New Officers

Cascade Water Alliance announced its new officers who will serve the seven member water provider for 2018 through 2019.  Bellevue Councilmember John Stokes was elected to serve as board chair.  Kirkland Councilmember Penny Sweet will serve as vice chair, and Redmond Council President Angela Birney will serve as secretary treasurer.

Other members of the board include Issaquah Mayor Mary Lou Pauly, Lloyd Warren, president of  Sammamish Plateau Water, Jon Ault, president of the Skyway Water and Sewer District and Tukwila Mayor Allan Eckberg.

Cascade is a municipal corporation that provides water to members Bellevue, Issaquah, Kirkland, Redmond, Tukwila, Sammamish Plateau Water and the Skyway Water and Sewer District.  Cascade serves more than 350,000 residents and 20,000 businesses.

“Cascade is committed to ensuring safe, clean, reliable water supply to the people and businesses in our members’ service areas in a cost effective and environmentally responsible manner,” said Chair Stokes.

Currently, Cascade gets its water from Seattle, and it also owns and operates Lake Tapps reservoir in east Pierce County for eventual municipal water supply,

“Cascade is proud to work collaboratively with other water providers in the region to use every drop of water prior to developing new sources,” he added.  “Lake Tapps reservoir remains a resource for the future, an insurance policy for the region.”

Cascade is active in its service area helping engage and educate the public around the importance of maintaining a clean, reliable water supply. Residents will see Cascade’s booth and special chalkboard wall, entitled “We Need Water because….”, at community events throughout the area, starting with the Northwest Flower and Garden Festival happening now through Feb 11 at the Washington State Convention Center.

At these events, people will have the opportunity to engage with staff regarding how best to use water wisely at home, at work and in their yards.  Cascade presents the Cascade Gardener program, offering about 30 special classes showing residents how to have lovely gardens and landscaping while using less water.  These classes are offered from February through April and are free but interested parties are asked to register atwww.cascadewater.org   Students at all levels throughout the region learn conservation and the importance of water in their classrooms using a special curriculum provided by Cascade Water Alliance.

For more information about Cascade visit www.cascadewater.org 

DATES TO KEEP IN MIND

·  January 2

The lake will be lowered to 530 feet through mid to late February for work on the dikes by Cascade and projects planned by the city of Bonney Lake and Pierce County.

·  Mid to late February (Timing is dependent on completion of projects mentioned above.)

Refilling the lake will begin.

·   Spring of 2018

The Corp of Engineers’ Mud Mountain Dam Fish Passage Project will begin. This project could last up to four years. During this project, Cascade will only be able to bring the water level down to approximately 538 to 539 feet.


Lake Tapps is a recreational gem of the region, especially for the homeowners who live near its shore. But it’s also a working reservoir owned and operated to eventually provide municipal drinking water to members of the Cascade Water Alliance. Keeping Lake Tapps clean and healthy is up to everyone who enjoys the lake today and into the future. Residents are advised that nutrients from failing septic tanks and nutrients from fertilizers and from runoff feed vegetation in the reservoir and can result in excessive algae, toxic algae blooms, reduced water clarity, and stress on fish and wildlife.

Cascade purchased the 100-plus year old White River system and Lake Tapps Reservoir from Puget Sound Energy in 2009. Since then, Cascade has invested tens of millions of dollars to keep the reservoir infrastructure reliable and the waters healthy with milfoil control.

Cascade needs the help of residents to keep Lake Tapps clean and healthy! Learn more about Cascade Water Alliance at www.cascadewater.org.


Algae Watch, Alerts and Information

Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department tracks Lake Tapps for possible toxic algae or bacterial contamination.

If you would like to learn more or get involved in Algae Watch, please email:
EHSurfaceWater-Shellfish@tpchd.org.

If you would like to receive alerts about environmental or human health concerns at area waterways, sign up at:
http://www.tpchd.org/email.php.

For more information about toxic algae, go to:
www.tpchd.org/toxic-algae.

Question?
Call: (253) 798-6470.
 


Lake Tapps Reservoir is a beautiful recreational area, but it is also part of Cascade Water Alliance’s water supply system, including the lake bed (up to elevation 545 feet), the dikes, and the entire White River system.
To keep a healthy, safe reservoir, the following regulations are in place for recreational and public access:

Dikes: Dikes are closed to the public, accessible only by homeowners whose property abuts the dikes or if one has a license issued by Cascade.  All other presence on dikes is trespassing. Unlicensed structures on dikes will be removed at owner cost.

Lake Bed: To build or remodel bulkheads or docks, a Cascade license and all appropriate permits must be obtained before work can start. Unpermitted structures will be removed at owner cost.

Closed Areas: Trespassing on the dikes, within the White River Project, or on Cascade areas posted “no trespassing” will be referred to law enforcement agencies. This is for safety.
Cascade and its partners in law enforcement, fire and schools remind swimmers that the reservoir is glacier fed, and is therefore often very cold in some places. Recreation enthusiasts should call 911 if they spot trouble on the lake, trespassers, speeders, violators or people in damage.  

To assist homeowners in planning ahead for project work, Cascade has issued the following lake level plans (subject to change due to unforeseen circumstances).  The reservoir level in the summer is 542.5 feet, and most winters it is 539.5 feet.  However, in winter 2018-19, it will be down to between 530 – 532 feet for project work. 

For more information about Lake Tapps, visit http://cascadewater.org 
To obtain a license for work on your property visit http://cascadewater.org/lake_tapps_licenses_and_permits.phpp 
For who to call around the lake visit http://cascadewater.org/lake_tapps_who_to_call.phpp 

Want to be notified of important updates? Click the boat to send us a note with "Add me please." in the Subject line. We'll add you to our list!

Bear in Boat

(laketappscc@gmail.com)


Lake Tapps
Watercraft Usuage


CONTACTS

Emergency: 911
Non-Emergency:
253 798 4721

Option '1'

Pierce County Sheriff
Boating Hotline:
253 798 3300


Lake Tapps Hotline
253 891 5460

Cascade Water Alliance
877 299 0930

Email

City of Bonney Lake
253 447 4344

Email

Pierce County
Planning and Land Service
253 796 7210


Washington State
Fish and Wildlife

360 902 2200